Progress in the Commercialization of Graphene

European Plastics News posted an article on it's site last week,("Graphene developers seek routes out of the lab"), focusing on challenges to and progress in the commercialization of graphene, specifically its "potential as a mutlifunctional reinforcement in composites".

Among the challenges the article raises are:

1) Entangling of 3D carbon nanotubes (CNTS) bundles

2) Individual graphite sheets restacking themselves

3) Handling of such shets during transportation to processing facilities

4) Reduction of costs of production and transportation

5) A need to develop standard operating procedures for potential health hazards

While these challenges may seem daunting, the success of three companies - Vorbeck Materials of Maryland,Cabot Corporation of Massachusetts, and Thomas Swan & Co., based in the United Kingdom - are highlighted.

The article also discusses the ongoing support of  the European Commission (EC) and the UK's government of research in graphene and how to commercialize it.:

The European Commission is planning to channel €1bn over 10 years into co-ordinated graphene research and commercialisation. The UK government has announced it wants to spend another £50m (€60.7m) to keep the UK at the forefront of graphene research, with the University of Manchester set to host a national institute of graphene research. Commercialisation of graphene by this route could arrive by late 2012.

Converted in US dollars, the EC will be spending $1.278 billion and the UK $78.153 million.

Knights of the Nano Table

Among the United Kingdom's many traditions is the Queen's New Year' Honors List, a list of politicians, actors, writers and others awarded with knighthoods for distinguished services in fields ranging from charitable work to business to acting. Among this years honorees are Professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both of the University of Manchester.

As noted here in October 2010, Professors Geim and Novoselov were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery of graphene.

The two new knights join Sir Mark Edward Welland, head of theUniversity of Cambridge's Nanoscience Centre, in being honored for their contributions to the fields of nanotechnology and nanoparticle research. Sir Mark's knighthood was discussed here inJune 2011.

According to a press release on the University of Manchester's site, Professor Geim seemed to be taking his knighthood in stride:

Professor Geim said: “In my life, I have got used to being called four-letter names. Going down to three is a completely new experience which I will hopefully enjoy.”

Rule Britannia.

New Nanoscale Carbon Website -- CNT Report

Readers may be interested in learning about a new subscription website devoted to nanoscale carbon -- CNT Report

CNT Report is dedicated to bringing its readers the most recent news concerning important issues affecting nanoscale carbon research, development, and commercialization.  CNT Report closely covers all forms of nanoscale carbon in development on the global stage, including CNTs, graphene, fullerenes, specialty fibers, and all else in-between.  CNT Report's primary focus is on new scientific research developments, practical applications, finance, legal and regulatory issues, and general commercialization.   CNT Report publishes news in several broad categories including: Business, Commercialization,  Finance & Deals, Insurance, Intellectual Property, International Laws & Regulations, Policy, Standards, States, Science, Applications, Current Research, and Environmental, Health and Safety.

CNT Report also accepts press releases, research results, financial news, or any other news item related to nanoscale carbon which it then makes available to all of its subscribers.  CNT Report welcomes timely contributions from its readers and makes sure that their articles receive proper attribution and credit.

 

An Industry-Driven Approach to EHS Issues

My new Nanotechnology Law & Business article -- "An Industry Driven Approach to EHS Issues: 'The NanoSafety Consortium for Carbon'" -- can be found here.  The abstract follows.

The NanoSafety Consortium for Carbon (NCC) is an industry-driven group formed to proactively address potential environmental, health, safety, and regulatory concerns related to the commercia-lization of its members’ nanoscale carbon products. NCC was formed to take advantage of an offer by the EPA for a consortium of companies to providing testing regarding carbon nanotube toxicity. This article provides background on NCC’s activities, purpose, and goals.

Nanoscale Carbon: In Vivo Tox Bibliography

The NanoSafety Consortium for Carbon has recently posted a bibliography of in vivo tox studies on its website.  The bibliography is (obviously) a work in progress.  We would greatly appreciate it if our readers would bring to our attention any pertinent articles that are not already on the bibliography.  The articles will be used to inform and guide our attempt in crafting a representative toxicity testing regime with US EPA.  Many thanks in advance for your input.

NanoSafety Consortium for Carbon

Just a quick plug for our new NanoSafety Consortium for Carbon which was recently launched to address potential EHS issues concerning its members' products.  You can learn more about the consortium at: www.nanosafetyconsortium.com.